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Parrish Family Vineyard

PFV Blog

Keep up with the Parrish Family Vineyard!

Short Videos
Short videos about various aspects of the vineyard and winery. 

Wine & Food
Learn more about our food and wine program. 

Events
Learn more about our events & news.

Recipes 
Enjoy recipes from our Estate Chef, GM, and more!

Virtual Recipes 
Recipes for our virtual experiences & live IG with Chef Samantha

 


 

Cecily Parrish Ray
 
March 4, 2021 | Cecily Parrish Ray

Late Harvest Sauvignon Blanc - Start to Finish

We have been growing our Sauvignon Blanc at the Adelaida vineyard since 2013, while we had been using the fruit to produce our Estate Sauvignon Blanc since 2016, the winemaking team was compelled to try something new. They wanted to do a sauterne-style wine as it would be a nice addition to our lineup as we didn't have a sweet wine.  

What is a sauterne? Sauternes are from the Bordeaux region of France and they feature not only Sauvignon Blanc, but also Sémillon and Muscadelle. They tend to be heavier in body, sweet, and have notes of stone fruit, tropical fruit, florals, toasted sugar, coconut, and baking spices. It all depends on the fruit and barrel program, as you do age this style in barrels to add the wonderful body and secondary flavors. 


Back in 2019 we took the leap and held back some Sauvignon Blanc clusters from the main harvest in September and allowed the grapes to stay on the vine to develop more sugar. In November 2019, we harvested the remaining Sauvignon Blanc and they were raisined with colors of gold and pink-purple. Hence the term, Late Harvest because it was last to be harvested and allowed to develop more sugar, or higher brix (measurement of sugar). We normally pick at 21 brix for the Sauvignon Blanc, but for this wine, we picked at about 35 brix.  

Below is a video we recorded in the middle of the processing the Late Harvest Sauvignon Blanc with Cellar Master Ethan and Assistant Winemaker Cody sharing about this new wine: 


*I'm sorry about the background buzz from the winery!

One thing you may notice from the video is the vibrant color. It looks like orange juice! That color fades away during fermentation. After talking with Assistant Winemaker Cody, I learned more about why young wines have a cloudy color that is nowhere near what the finished product will look like. This is known as browning and it's a normal thing that happens during pressing wine. The oxygen dissolves causing the color. It also has some lees and sediment that are stirred up making it not as clear. The CO2 that occurs in fermentation helps lift the oxygen and at that point begins to change the color to be more clarified and golden rather than yellow-orange. 

During fermentation, the winemaking team used a weaker yeast so the process would stop at 15-16% alcohol and allow there to be residual sugar in the wine.

What is residual sugar? This is what makes wine sweet. Dry wines have no residual sugar because they have had all the sugar eaten up by yeast during fermentation. Sometimes wine tasters think that sweetness in a dry wine is sugar, but that is most likely the fruit notes of the palate. So, if you like wines that are "sweet" in a dry wine then you would want to look for wines that fruit-forward, less tannic, and have spent time in stainless steel or little time in the barrel. 


After processing, the wine then journeyed to oak. The Late Harvest aged in 35% new French oak and 65% neutral oak for about 16 months. This gave the wine more body than our traditional Sauvignon Blanc. Typically, the winemaking team ages Sauvignon Blanc in stainless steel to keep it light and crisp, whereas the Late Harvest is aged to be heavier bodied with more creaminess and caramelization. 

The day we bottled the Late Harvest Sauvignon Blanc, I got to taste it and it was delicious. The notes I got were apricot, lemon and grapefruit jelly candies (think of those Sunkist ones), cream soda, toffee, and then a beautiful brush of acidity. I love the acidity in this wine as it helps balance the body to keep it from becoming cloyingly sweet.

For the winemaking team, it is such a rewarding day to take the wines that have been worked on for a couple of months or years and finish them. They get to see the once grapes transformed to wine and then placed in the bottle. It is also rewarding for the team to do something new and have it turn out to be wonderful. No longer a thought, but a reality. 

As far as packaging, it is different from our other bottles as the label is with gold accents and the bottle is smaller, 375ml (rather than 750ml). Our whole team voted on the bottle shape for a few days in bottle planning. It was very sophisticated as we lined up 2 options on the counter and then did a tally on post-it notes. It became a bit of a competition, jokingly, as one bottle was being picked by a landslide and the other was lonely with 1 tally mark. But that team member began convincing other team members to bring them to her side. Haha. Alas, the popular bottle was chosen. It was a good attempt! In summation, it was a team effort in picking the packaging. 

So, importantly, how should you serve this? Chilled. I would recommend a smaller glass so you can easily access the nose. This will age well. I have yet to try it after being open a couple of days, but feel this would last longer open than a stainless steel, crisp Sauvignon Blanc. Regardless, this wine will age in the bottle for some time. 

And then what do you pair it with? You can do dessert with this wine. I would say tarts would be lovely with it like a lemon, coconut, or almond. Cheesecake would be simple and decadent with the Late Harvest. For the release weekend, Estate Chef Samantha paired it with aphrodisiac macarons; fig & pistachio, strawberry balsamic, and raspberry chocolate (awesome!). The fig & pistachio macaron was my favorite with this wine, so taking inspiration to home, try thyme mascarpone figs with roasted pistachio and honey drizzle. 

And then let's not forget cheese & charcuterie as this would be beautiful with a board for starters or dessert, I mean why not! Here are some thoughts; baked brie, Fromarer D'affinois Blue Cheese, St. Agur Blue Cheese, Cypress Grove Humboldt Fog, Asiago Rosemary, Idiazabal, Manchego, Honey Bee Goat Cheese, Oakdale Lemon Quark, Foie Gras, Duck Prosciutto, Alle Pia Calabrese Salami, and Smoking Goose Spruce & Candy Salame. Add some fun accouterments like quince paste, bacon jam (Olivas de Oro does one), Marcona almonds, dried nectarines, dried cherries, homemade candied pecans, pumpkin seeds, shortbread biscuits, sourdough, or brioche toast...you'll be set! 

I hope you enjoyed learning more about this new wine. Cheers, and if you're a club member, you can pick up this wine here

-Cecily 

 

Parrish Team
 
January 22, 2021 | Parrish Team

Aphrodisiac Macarons

**Special Event - February 12th-14th**

Yes, you saw that right, Aphrodisiac Macarons! These handcrafted macarons by Chef Samantha are perfect for enjoying the Valentine's holiday as the flavors are decadent and enticing. They pair perfectly with our soon to be released 2018 Late Harvest Sauvignon Blanc, which will be available to Wine Club Members starting that same weekend. 

There are 6 macarons per box with 2 each of the following flavors: Fig & Pistachio, Chocolate Raspberry, and Strawberry Balsamic. 

We cannot wait for you to try these macarons and you can enjoy either by pick up or togo onsite (we are unable to provide full service at this time). With the boxes being limited, be sure to pre-order your box! You can do so here.

Pick ups and togo onsite is available February 12th-14th, 11am-3:30pm. Cheers! 

Cecily Parrish Ray
 
December 22, 2020 | Cecily Parrish Ray

Wine Pairings - Christmas Movies!

We were thinking that this is a perfect time for wine pairings with Christmas movies. Our family has always loved watching movies this time of year and there are a few that are tradition for Christmas Eve and Christmas Day. So here’s our list...

2018 Sauvignon Blanc –  Rifftrax Christmas (Mystery Science Theater 3000 Fans) 


2018 Chardonnay – The Santa Clause (1994)


2016 Petite Sirah – The Family Man (2000)
 

2016 Silken – While You Were Sleeping (1995)


2016 Four Chords – Christmas Carol (1951, traditionally on Christmas Eve) 


2016 Estate Cabernet Sauvignon – Miracle on 34th Street (1947)
 

2016 Reserve Cabernet Sauvingon – It’s a Wonderful Life (1946, traditionally on Christmas Day)


Tomorrow is National Christmas Movie Marathon day, so grab a blanket, turn on the tree, and enjoy! We’re open 11am-5pm if you need some wine for this. Cheers!

Parrish Team
 
Cecily Parrish Ray
 
September 25, 2020 | Cecily Parrish Ray

New Pairing: Macaron Flight

**We're sorry macarons are no longer available. June 2021**


Guests have beeing asking for something sweet on the menu, and Estate Chef Samantha has added a very special experience to the menu. We are pleased to announce that we now have on Fridays & Saturdays a Macaron Flight. 

These macarons are thoughtfully crafted in house by Chef Samantha. Most of us think of macarons as being French, but these special treats are an Italian style. Interestingly enough, the special cookie originated when an Italian chef made them for a French royal in the 1500's.  

Our macarons are not only visually striking, but specifically designed with our wines in mind. Chef Samantha makes beautiful fillings, such as the delicious, amazing apple butter for one macaron. I am a big macaron fan and I can say these are some of the best I've had, so definitely check out this experience. -Cecily 

2017 Zinfandel paired with Apple Pie Macaron

2016 Petite Sirah paired with Lavender Chocolate Macaron

2016 Estate Cabernet Sauvignon with Pistachio Blueberry Macaron

 

This experience is recommended by reservation here.  

 

Parrish Team
 
May 23, 2020 | Parrish Team

Opening Thursday, May 28th - New Hours!

We are excited to share we are opening our doors on Thursday, May 28th for service! We have our current hours listed below in this email. 

We have new wines and an entirely new food menu to share with you! You can review the food menu here. Our team has been working tirelessly the last few weeks in preparation for this moment. A huge thank you to them!

Regarding visiting, things are going to look a little different as we have guidelines set forth by our County in this 2nd Phase of re-opening. Things will change possibly in the future, so we appreciate your patience as we head into these uncharted waters together. Our top priority above all is your safety and the safety of our staff. We are following sanitizing and cleaning guidelines that have been set forth. 

The following are important notes regarding your visit as these are inline with the County guidelines:

  • Reservations are required for visits at this time. Reservations can be made here
  • Masks will be required while entering the tasting room and we can provide one if needed.
  • All wine purchases must accompany a food order. We ask that there only be one check per table and that group sizes are limited to 10 people. 
  • Most seating will be outdoors. All tables are set at six feet apart to maintain proper social distancing, this includes our limited indoor seating.

We know that this will be an adjustment and again we appreciate your patience. We are beyond thrilled to have you visit and finally be able to enjoy our beautiful location, wines, and food! 

Hours

Thursday-Sunday

11am-6pm 

Reservations Required, but it's easy to make here!

 

Cecily Parrish Ray
 
April 9, 2020 | Cecily Parrish Ray

Easy Sourdough Starter + Tips

Sourghdough starters do sound challenging, but I hope to help make them more approachable as I was not born a bread baker. Starters are great for not only baking bread, but also  cakes, cookies, and pasta. You can become your own bakery essentially, which is especially helpful being shut in. We have been making a Cabernet Sourdough since we opened in 2018. This starter was made from our Cabernet Sauvignon grapes, which you can read about on a previous blog post here. While I love our starter, it is not feasible for those at home wanting to start their own right now. 

Two weeks ago I saw a starter recipe that looked really simple from Taste of Home and decided to try it a couple weeks ago. It went great, so without further ado I am going to share the recipe with a few tweaks, feeding info, and helpful starter info as I had a ton of questions when I started!  Also, I will have a few tips if you are missing ingredients, or in need of a gluten free starter as everyone has different needs right now. 

The Starter Recipe:  
 1 & ½ teaspoons (or a packet) of Yeast
2 Cups (11 oz) of Flour
2 Cups (16 oz) of Water at 70-75°F
 

Use a container like a large tupperware that you can put a lid on. Avoid a metal bowl for your starter as that will impact the temperature of your starter. You can use measuring spoons/cups or a digital scale. Digital scales tend to be more accurate. You will also need a thermometer to take the water temp. 

*Yeast: Original recipe calls for Active Yeast. I used Instant Yeast and turned out just fine. Use what you have.

*Flour: The recipe calls for All Purpose (AP) Flour, but you could substitute for Bread Flour. Below I share the differences in flour.

Step 1 – Put 2 cups of flour the bowl/container.

Step 2 – Pour in yeast and stir with flour. 

Step 3 – Measure 2 cups of water and take its temperature. 70-75°F is ideal for the temp, but if your home runs cooler or warmer, make adjustments. Like I'd do 80-85°F for a colder home. Yeast likes warmth and it encourages activity. I would avoid going over 90°F.

Step 4 – Gradually pour in the water, while stirring with a spatula. Stir until well incorporated. I like to stir for a few minutes to encourage the yeast to be active.

That’s it. You’ll notice it will become active and bubbly within hours. Let it hang out for about 4 days. Stirring occasionally throughout the day to encourage the yeast to be active. You will notice that it will start to smell more sour and a liquid will form on the top. All apart of it and it is fine. By day 4, feed the starter.   

To Feed:

Step 1 – Stir the starter for a few minutes. Do not pour off the liquid. Some recipes do this, but I disagree as it’s just apart of the starter.

Step 2 – Pour out about ½ to 1 cup of starter. I did a cup.

Step 3 – Pour in 1 cup (8 oz) 70-75°F water and stir.

Step 4 – Pour in 1 cup (5.5 oz) of flour and stir. Stir as long as you can to encourage activity.

So, that’s the recipe, but here’s more info to help with your sourdough starter journey. 


What is happening in the starter? Protein in the flour forms gluten. Yeast eats gluten and it produces CO2. The gluten helps the bread have strength and gives it rise. The water in the starter is helping the yeast move around and encourage the integration with the gluten. Also, yeast likes warmth and movement. So, the water temperature and the movement of the stirring encourage the activity.


There's no yeast in the stores right now? A real issue and there’s no need to panic. I have read blogs mentioning alternatives and one of those is…pineapple juice. This is similar to what we are doing with our grapes. Here's one I found on Breadtopia

I’m gluten free? Okay! Well there’s sourdough starters that are gluten free…I found this on King Arthur's site

Bread Flour vs. All Purpose Flour?  Bread Flour has a higher gluten percent than All Purpose Flour (AP), which is why it is used for baking breads. The typical percentages are below:

  • All Purpose is 10.5%
  • Bread Flour 12.5%
  • High Gluten Bread Flour 14%

The more gluten you have for the yeast to eat...the more activity you will have. That said if all you have is All Purpose or Wheat, making a starter will still work!  
 

Storing the starter? 

Method 1: Store on the counter and feed daily. This is great if you are a baker and bake daily.

Method 2: Store the starter in the fridge. So, the cold will cause the starter to slow down in activity. Upon removing from the fridge for use, feed more like 2-3 times a day for 2-3 days to awaken the starter. 

Some starters can be kept in the fridge without feeding for up to a month or more. I would say this depends on the strength of your starter. If it's super active, then it will do great. I do usually up to a month for some of my starters.

Method 3: You can dry the starter on parchment during feeding. Take some of the starter and just spread it out on parchment paper and let it dry for a couple days. Then put the starter in a container like a mason jar. I recommend this for any starter you are discarding during feeding. Here's the article on King Arthur's site

What is the liquid on top of the starter? So, believe it or not this is called hooch and that's because it is technically alcohol...the byproduct of the activity between yeast and gluten. It is okay and it doesn't mean that your starter is bad.  Stir it into the starter and then feed your starter. 

How can you tell if it has gone bad? Starters share a lot about themselves via smell. Sweeter means that it has been fed and is happy. Sour means that it is probably needing food. 

Acetone and funky smells equals hmmm, something is awry. You just want to start feeding the starter, like you would when waking it up, to try to save it. 

Mold or discolouration are a sign of no bueno. Just try your best to feed and save, but I would look at your saved dry starter at this point.

At feeding it feels wasteful, can I make something with the discarded (pitched) starter? Yes! Pancakes is a well-known option, but there are plenty of things you can do with pitched starter. You can dry some for storage. You can also give the pitched starter to someone else. Starter = giving.  

How to know if your starter is ready for use?  The visual activity of the bubbles will indicate its activity level, but again smell is important. In Tartine’s Bread, the sweeter smells it is fed and more ready to use. The more sour means it needs more feeding and time. I will say that with time you will get to know your starter and will have a feeling.

Another method is the Float Test. Take some of the starter (like a little piece) and put in water. If it floats, it’s ready for use. If it doesn’t float, well it’s not ready. This is not always accurate, keep in mind, according to some bakers. 

Can you bake with whatever flour and the starter? You can bake with whatever flours you would like. Some recipes use blends for more flavor. You will get different textures and densities as well.  Bread flour due to its higher gluten percentage will have better crumb (meaning the texture and hole pattern in the bread will be more desirable for the sourdough). 

How sour does the sourdough get? The sourness of sourdough is just what the starter decides to create. It's the nature of your starter. So, do not be surprised if if it is not super sour. If you want more sourness to your sourdough bread, try using more starter in the recipe. Or try longer fermentation when making the dough.

Ideas for best bakes with sourdough bread? Dutch ovens are awesome and easy. You need steam for sourdough bread. Let's say you don’t have a dutch oven or cast iron with a lid and a water bath in your oven is a bit of a deal. This write up had some great ideas for getting steam going in your bake: https://truesourdough.com/3-ways-to-make-amazing-sourdough-bread-without-a-dutch-oven/

Best ways to store bread? Wrap in parchment, sarane wrap, and then leave on counter - lasts about 4 days-5days.


That was quite the write up, but I wanted to share thoughts and ideas that would encourage anyone to try their hand at this. This is a great project while stuck at home and/or you have some kids. Honestly, the starter becomes like a pet. You have to care for it. The Parrish team giggle at me as I will remember I have to feed my starter, or fold my bread in the midst of a meeting and rush out to care for it. Regardless of the amount of work it has brought to my life, I enjoy it and the fact that it brings joy to others.

Be well and Enjoy!

Cecily

Parrish Team
 
March 5, 2020 | Parrish Team

New Paired Tasting Flight!

We are thrilled to share that we have a new Paired Flight and we cannot wait for you to try it! The Paired Flight is a seasonal showcase featuring three wines crafted by our family and three dishes crafted by our Estate Chef Samantha Eitel. She is thrilled to showcase our wines through her food.


Argentine Prawns and Soba Noodle Salad Paired with 2017 Sauvignon Blanc
Sautéed Red Argentine Prawns nestled on top of an Asian Soba Noodle Salad with a Lemongrass Tamari Vinaigrette and Sesame Seared Baby Bok Choy

"This pairing made me speechless the first time I had it. The dish was perfect at complimenting the wine and making it shine." - Vanessa, Director of Wine Experiences


Braised Short Rib Paired with 2016 Silken
Silken Braised Short Rib with Cherry Wild Mushroom Bordelaise, Crumbled Big Rock Bleu Cheese, sautéed Broccolini topped with Crispy Shallots

"I love the 2016 Silken and to pair it with a tender short rib...delicious." - David, Winemaker & Owner 


Bosch Poached Pear Paired with 2016 Estate Cabernet Sauvignon
Cabernet Spiced Cider Poached Pear with Cabernet Raspberry Reduction and Chinese Five Spice Mascarpone Whip

"The pear is a beautiful way to finish the paired flight as it is elegant and I love the warm spices from the mascarpone. The Cabernet and pear end up balancing each other to make a clean finish." - Cecily, General Manager


We invite you to join us for this experience, which is available on Fridays and Saturdays from 12:00pm-2:30pm. We do recommend reservations, please feel free to email reservations@parrishfamilyvineyard.com. The experience is $50 per person and can definitely be enjoyed for lunch. We look forward to seeing you soon!

Cecily Parrish Ray
 
January 9, 2020 | Cecily Parrish Ray

Cabernet Sauvignon Sourdough

Hi everyone! Cecily Parrish Ray here. I wanted to share with you all my passion for our Cabernet Sourdough bread and the journey I’ve been on to make it for our tasting room. In 2017, my dad and I discussed what our hopes were for the new tasting room at our Adelaida Vineyard and one of those was baking our own bread.

Unsure how to go about this, one morning I stumbled upon an old Julia Child video featuring Nancy Silverton, who started La Brea Bakery. Silverton was crafting a sourdough starter from store bought table grapes. It dawned on me in that moment that we had a whole vineyard and I could use grapes at harvest to make a starter. But, there was one fact that still remained…I didn’t know anything about baking breads.

That changed with a serendipitous visit from Chef William Carter and his wife Katherine of Canyon Villa Bed & Breakfast to our downtown tasting room. He was the Executive Chef of the Playboy Mansion for 30 years and during that time he had begun baking artisan breads. I told him about the Cabernet Sauvignon starter I wanted to do and I asked if he could help me. 

For six days in January 2018, Chef Wills worked with me in his kitchen where it smelled of delicious baked bread and my hands were covered in flour. He showed me the ropes of managing a sourdough starter from feeding to baking. He had taken some of our 2017 Cabernet grapes at harvest and began a starter from it. He gifted me with the starter for me to use at our new tasting room. He also taught me other artisan breads. including the focaccia we now make in the tasting room. It was a wonderful experience that I cherish.

I have continued to keep alive the original Cab starter, but in the Fall of 2019, I decided to try my hand at making my own Cab starter. Early on September 22nd, I rushed into the winery with a bucket and grabbed freshly picked grapes from the bins. It was busy season to start working on a side project, but I really wanted to see if I could do my own starter. I then began mixing flour and water with a cheese cloth full of Cabernet Grapes. It bubbled and popped. It smelled like sweet yeast. It took about 12 days for the starter to get to a point where I could begin to use it. I fed it for a while and then did my first bake with it to share with family on Thanksgiving. The bread turned out perfectly.

I now have two starters that I am keeping alive and we’ll see if I have time do any others. Regardless if I increase my starter family, I am happy that I can continue to bake Cabernet Sourdough for my family as well as the families that come in to our tasting room. It has been a lot of work, but it fits with the food program my dad and I envisioned for our tasting room and we hope you enjoy it!

 

 

 

Rachel Ponce
 
September 6, 2019 | Rachel Ponce

New Paired Flight for Fall

You're invited for our new Fall Flight. Estate Chef Rachel Ponce talks about her creation of this exciting new wine and food pairing featuring:

Barrel Aged Berry Sausage and Butterfly Pea Flower Puree Paired with 2017 Sauvignon Blanc
Homemade lamb and pork, barrel aged luxardo cherries, cilantro and juniper sausage on top of a creamy butterfly pea flower and cauliflower puree, garnished with dill, English pea's and feta

Smoked Salmon over Buckwheat Flour Pancake and Cacao Fig Mousse Paired with 2016 Zinfandel 
Locally caught salmon, smoked on top of a buckwheat pancake, side of cacao fig mouse, garnished with chives, micro-greens and salmon caviar 

Burrata, Roasted Tomato, Prosciutto di Parma and Pesto Paired with 2015 Silken
Homemade burrata, Italian herb-roasted tomato, prosciutto di Parma and drizzled with an arugula hazelnut pesto